Articles Tagged with Marital credit for foreign nationals

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congress-e1521771059150-300x231The tax legislation passed by Congress last year is something of a 1950s pop love song to businesses: sweet but not very deep.  It will likely have little impact on Canadians unless they own and operate a US company.  Typically, Canadians invest in US assets, particularly real estate, rather than run US operations.  The tax package has little to offer in that regard.  But one change does make a difference.  The new law doubles the US estate tax exemption amount.  Given the size of the increase, the US estate tax now leaves all but the wealthiest Canadians untouched.  However, this situation is temporary, making long-term estate planning for Canadians with US property tricky.

Canadians And US Estate Taxes

Canadians who own US assets (typically a vacation home) have traditionally been paranoid about US estate taxes.  It’s understandable.  The US estate tax rate has lurched between 35% and 65% in recent history, with a current rate of 40%.  Before 2003, when the exemption amount was $2 million or less, the estate of a Canadian with a valuable vacation home in the US could easily get hit with a significant estate tax.  Still, the anxiety was always exaggerated, given the favorable treatment Canadians receive under the US-Canada Tax Treaty.  This is especially true after 2010, when the exemption shot up to $5 million, with annual upward adjustments.

How The Treaty Works

The Treaty provides Canadians with the most favorable estate tax treatment of any US tax treaty.  Besides mitigating double taxation by providing for a deduction for Canada’s equivalent of an estate tax (the “deemed disposition” tax), the Treaty allows the estates of Canadians to benefit from the exemption amount available to US citizens.  The exemption is prorated based on the ratio of the value of taxable US assets to the value of the worldwide assets owned by the decedent.  To use simple numbers, if a Canadian died in 2011 when the exemption was $5 million, and his total assets were $5 million, with a vacation home located in the US worth $2.5 million, the estate would apply a percentage of the exemption amount equal to the US asset value over the total asset value. Result: a $2.5 million exemption against a US estate worth $2.5 million.  Accordingly, the estate would owe no estate taxes. Continue reading →

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shutterstock_341354720-sm-jpg-300x185-300x185One of the major concerns of Canadians holding US real estate or other assets is whether the property will be subject to the US estate tax when they die.  It’s no small matter.  The estate tax top rate is 40%, and unlike Americans, foreign nationals who own US assets generally only qualify for a paltry $60,000 estate tax exclusion amount, not the current (2018) $11.2 million unified credit available to American citizens.  Theoretically, if no planning were done and a foreign national died with a US vacation home worth $1 million, his estate would owe about $322,000 in US estate taxes.

Just as important, while American citizens have the benefit of the unlimited marital deduction when they leave their estate to a spouse (which is the typical estate plan), noncitizen couples cannot make use of the marital deduction to reduce or eliminate US estate taxes (unless they establish a QDOT, discussed below).

Fortunately for most Canadians, however, the US-Canada Tax Convention and its protocols, come to the rescue, if they plan right.  Here’s how.

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Executors probating Canadian estates that include US real estate or other assets subject to the US estate tax system, need to know how the US-Canada Tax Treaty may work to their benefit.  Just as important, they have to understand how to timely “invoke” the treaty, so that the tax benefits they are entitled to accrue to the Canadian estate and aren’t lost.

What US Assets Are Subject To US Estate Tax?

Not all US assets owned by a Canadian or other foreign nationals are subject to the US estate tax system. Mainly, the value of their US vacation home or other real estate, and the value of their US securities (stock of US companies) are included in calculating any US estate tax. US securities count no matter where the Canadian holds the stocks. But there is an exception for the US securities held by a Canadian mutual fund. Unfortunately, there is no exception for securities held by a Registered Retirement Savings Plan of a Canadian. The value of US securities held by a RRSP count in determining the US estate tax obligation of a Canadian decedent.