Articles Tagged with California Residency Tax

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ill-never-make-that-mistake-again-ill-never-make-that-mistake-again-lyric-1-233x300With Tax Day having come and gone, the Franchise Tax Board, California’s tax authority, is now busy sending out its annual 4600 Notices, also known as “Request for Tax Return” letters.  Almost all 4600 Notices are sent to nonresidents, mostly those who own a vacation home or have a business interest in California, and have made one of several common mistakes.  For a full discussion of what a 4600 Notice is, see “They’re Back: FTB 4600 Notices Coming Soon to You.”

If you receive a 4600 Notice, the first order of business is to timely and effectively respond.  Whether that means filing a nonresident tax return (a Form 540NR) or providing a proper legal explanation for why you don’t have to, depends on the circumstances.  Second, assuming the notice gets resolved favorably, the next task is preventing the same problem from recurring in future years.

Automatic vs “Reviewed” Triggers

4600 Notices don’t just happen.  They are triggered.  The trigger is usually one of several common, avoidable mistakes by nonresidents.

In my practice, the typical 4600 Notice involves a nonresident who owns a vacation home in California with a mortgage.  Out of convenience or just as an oversight, the nonresident tells the mortgage lender to send the Form 1098 Mortgage Interest Statement to the vacation home.  Form 1098 is the “informational tax return” mortgage lenders generate to report loan interest.  They send one copy to the FTB and another to the borrower.  If the “Payer/Borrower” address on the 1098 is in California, and the borrower doesn’t file a state tax return, the FTB will automatically send a 4600 Notice.  Continue reading →

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2982476-300x225Let’s go over the basics of California residency taxation.  They can be brutal.

How Residents And Nonresidents Are Taxed

California residents are subject to California state income tax on all income regardless where earned.  It doesn’t matter what or where the source.  If a California resident derives income from investments in Saudi Arabia or from pensions that accrued while working in Ohio, California will tax that income.  The resident may get a credit for payment of taxes on income earned in other states or other countries (if a tax treaty permits), but the default rule is, the income is subject to California income tax. With a rate that is currently the highest in the nation (the distinction tends to go back and forth with New York), California residency comes with a significant tax impact.

In contrast, nonresidents are only subject to California state income tax on their California-source income.  That may be zero or it may be significant.  California-source income takes many forms, from rents derived from California real estate to business operations to performing temporary work in-state.  To give a rather public example, when LeBron James, an Ohio resident, not a California resident, plays the Lakers at Staples Center, he pays California taxes on the income he made on game night, which in his case is no small amount.

So the stakes are high when determining whether a taxpayer is a California resident or not.

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